The MTV Movie Awards Continues to Reflect the American Filmgoer’s Stupidity

The MTV Movie Awards has never been something that “the industry” takes seriously. However, since its inception in 1992, it seems the executives at MTV have tried to blend elements of sophistication with giving the people what they want. This combination, of course, can never be successful. What makes the awards ceremony simultaneously empowering and depressing is that the network allows its viewers to vote on which works will receive a Golden Popcorn (this symbol alone being a larger indication of the clientele voting). And so, this awards ceremony truly reflects what the “average” film audience enjoys.
Zac Efron was one of the recipients this year
Zac Efron was one of the recipients this year

And what they enjoy in 2014, apparently, is The Hunger GamesThat Awkward Moment and We’re The Millers. Everything, in essence, that the Academy (and even the Golden Globes) would never consider. This isn’t to say that the aforementioned award ceremonies aren’t any shittier for different reasons–but it is to say that the MTV Movie Awards is down to consider whatever scraps are left un-nominated by other shows. 

Your 2014 host, Conan O'Brien
Your 2014 host, Conan O’Brien

Still, there were clear moments when MTV tried its best to come across as classy, with wins from Jonah Hill in The Wolf of Wall Street and Jared Leto in Dallas Buyers Club. But these small glimpses into semi-decent taste were hindered by award categories like #WTF Moment and Best Scared Shitless Performance. 

http://youtu.be/ycYYm7n4Y4E

It’s all ultimately telling of what America is interested in subjecting their eyeballs to in terms of film. As the show has gone on, the nominees and nominations have only gotten worse. Whether that’s MTV’s fault or the fault of the available choices out there is arbitrary. But gone are the days of hosts like Sarah Jessica Parker (2000), winning movies like Pulp Fiction (1995) and best performances from actors like Denzel Washington (1993) and Julia Roberts (2001).